change

Change is Not That Difficult and I’ll Prove It!

This exercise was given to me by Ronald Johnson, the Senior Quality Engineer at Silgan Plastics in Seymour, Indiana. Ron is a great teacher with great stories that definitely make you think!
Write your first and last name on a piece of paper or a white board five times with your dominant hand.
Time and record how long it takes to write your name five times.

Repeat the process three times (you should write your name a total of 15 times).

You should see that you have a consistent and stable process. It should take close to the same time to write your name each time that you write it.

Now write every other letter of your name on a piece of paper or on a white board five times.

Time and record how long it takes to write every other letter of your name five times.

Repeat the process three times (you should write your name a total of 15 times).

What you’ll see from this exercise is the first time you write your name using only every other letter, it was a very slow process.

This process of writing your name is not one that you are accustomed to.

Once you learn the process, the second through the fifth time you write every other letter of your name gets steadily faster.

The process gets more consistent and stable as you build a new habit.

This is a great way to show that we can learn a new process.

We are inherently afraid of change. In a Continuous Improvement effort, Change Agents often hear that “that is the way we have always operated.”

Even though a Cell, Department, or Organization “wants” change, they are still roadblocked by the “fear of change.”

What are some other games or simulations that we can use to show that change is not so difficult? Please tell us in the comments below.